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Dota Auto Chess: Ranks

How the ranking system works in Dota Auto Chess.

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About Ed Thorn

Ed's a huge fan of rushing B in CS:GO and grinding it out in Destiny 2. He will not rest until a new Wario Land is announced.

Our Dota Auto Chess ranks guide contains everything you need to know about all of the ranks in Dota Auto Chess and how to earn them.

Dota's Auto Chess custom mode has taken Dota 2 by storm. Simply glance over on Twitch and you'll find a dedicated page for Auto Chess, along with a number of streamer completely fixated on a mode which isn't even officially created by Valve.

It's still early days for the mode which means there are certain features which aren't quite as fleshed out as others. One such aspect is the ranking system. It's not clear how it actually works, and there aren't any pointers as to how you progress or what any of the ranks actually signify. We're sure there will be a big patch which will clear things up, but for now it's all a bit of mystery.

To help you get your head around the ranking system, we've pulled together as much information as we've been able to uncover about how it all works. We've got a brief breakdown of all the ranks themselves for you, followed by further insight into the win/loss system behind it all.

We'll be sure to update this guide when an inevitable update comes along and overhauls the ranking system, so don't forget to bookmark this page to keep up with the latest developments!

Take a look at our core Auto Chess guide if you'd like more help getting started with the game.

Essential Auto Chess Coverage

First up, here are the ranks themselves. The Pawn is the starting rank for each player, while Queen denotes those at the very top of the game:

  • 1. Queen
  • 2. King
  • 3. Castle
  • 4. Bishop
  • 5. Knight
  • 6. Pawn

As for what we know about the ranking process, here's a quick overview.

Note that a lot of this is based on anecdotal experience in the community. The developers have not explicitly explained the mechanics behind Auto Chess's ranking system.

  • Within each of the above categories are sub-ranks that are numbered 1-10. Once you hit the highest sub-rank, you'll move up a main rank. For example, once you've hit the highest sub-rank in Pawn, you'll be promoted to the lowest rank of Knight.
  • Players have reported having to win a large number of games in a row to make meaningful progression through sub-ranks. At Bishop level, it can take a dozen or more consecutive wins to increase by just a few sub-ranks.
  • Matchmaking isn't always spot on, so you may find yourself up against players ranked much lower than you. If this is the case, losing out to an opponent early on in a match can tank your ranking hard. Be sure to make it through as many rounds as possible to prevent this from happening.
  • Leaving matches early doesn't necessarily effect your ranking, although the rank gain or loss won't be calculated until the match itself has concluded. Obviously your ranking potential is affected by non-participation while the other players are still carrying on!

As soon as we learn more about ranks in Auto Chess we'll update this article. If there's anything you think we've missed though, let us know in the comments!

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